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A ROI of Process Modelling

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A ROI of Process Modelling

15_Blog_July-4

Dilemma? Every day, many thousands of hours are invested in creating business process models. Across the country, around the world, this is a massive investment in time, money, and energy. Is there a satisfactory return on modelling?

  1. Does your organization get maximum benefit from its investment in process modelling?
  2. As a modeller, do you personally feel your models make a difference?
  3. Do process models have a positive impact on the performance of your organization?
  4. Are there better ways to consistently develop useful process models?
  5. What is a ‘good’ process model?
  6. Can we consistently achieve process modelling excellence across our organizations?
Modelling activity is increasing across all architectural perspectives. This is driven by many factors including: increasing interest in process-based management, rapid increase in BPMS use, the complex needs of integrated EA modelling, and process-based standards compliance requirements.

Andreas Havliza will be presenting this masterclass at the 2015 Building Business Capability Conference in Sydney this August. The class provides clear, practical guidelines that can be applied immediately for effective process modelling by individuals and teams. It also answers the questions most frequently asked by modellers, those who manage them, and those who use their models. The masterclass is a breakthrough experience for process modellers and those who manage them.

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