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4 things to remember when creating Business Process Architecture (BPA)

Case-For-Process_fig1

Creating a BPA is not a trivial exercise, and since it will always be subject to change and the exploration of greater detail, it is a never-ending job. Nevertheless a useful, working BPA can be developed in a few months and the immediate value of doing so can be remarkable. Quite apart from creating a solid basis for effective ongoing process management, discovery of the BPA focuses the organization wonderfully on really understanding how it executes its strategic intent. This article details why Business Process Architecture is crucial as a strategic and operational management tool. 

Here are four practical steps you might consider doing now to get started on the creation Business Process Architecture (BPA)

  1. Just build it 

    You (yes, you) don't need permission to start building a BPA for your organization. Find the strategy statements and determine who are the customers and others stakeholders and your organization's value proposition for them. These are likely your core highest level processes (I'd call them Value Chains). Start decomposing those processes. You will need permission and agreement (and lots of it) to make it official, but you can start right now without anyone's approval.
  2. Hang it on the wall

    Once you've got something you and a few others think is reasonable, socialize it on internal websites or notice boards. ‘Hang it on the wall' and see what people say. Give folks the opportunity to comment and take note of who comments as well as what they say.
  3. Test performance

    Pick a process and try to measure its performance. If it was working well, how would you know? How is it performing? Is the performance gap something that should be fixed now?
  4. Continue the Discussion

    You've started the process performance discussion with a group of people who have expressed interest in the idea of process and the BPA. Keep talking.

 

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This article was originally published at www.BPTrends.com

Roger Tregear
Roger Tregear
Roger is a Consulting Associate with Leonardo. He delivers consulting and education assignments around the world. This work has involved many industry sectors, diverse cultures, and organization types. Roger briefs executives, coach managers, and support project teams to develop process-based management. Several thousand people have attended Roger's training courses and seminars in many countries - and Roger frequently presents at international business conferences. Roger has been writing a column on BPTrends called Practical Process for over 10 years. This led to the 2013 book of the same name. In 2011, he co-authored Establishing the Office of Business Process Management. He contributed a chapter in The International Handbook on Business Process Management (2010, 2015). With Paul Harmon in 2016, Roger co-edited Questioning BPM?, a book discussing key BPM questions. Roger's own book, Reimagining Management, was published in 2016.

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