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Leonardo partners with University of Melbourne’s Apromore

Leonardo and the University of Melbourne’s Apromore team today announced a partnership whereby Leonardo will be assisting the Apromore team in developing the platform strategy and implementing it through an agile methodology, and by providing industry-strength development power to improve the platform.

According to Leonardo Managing Director of Deliver Adam Mutton, “Apromore’s unique selling point is that its process mining capabilities are ahead of the curve, given that they are directly informed by many years of academic research, combined with numerous applications in the field. We have substantial experience in supporting open-source initiatives and are confident we can transfer this experience to the Apromore Initiative”.

Apromore is an open-source business process analytics platform combining state-of-the-art process mining capabilities with functionality for managing process model collections. Apromore’s wide range of advanced process mining features range from automated discovery through to variants mining and predictive process monitoring.

“We are thrilled to be partnering with Leonardo,” says Apromore team leader Professor Marcello La Rosa, from The University of Melbourne. “Leonardo Consulting is an acknowledged thought-leader in process analysis and improvement, and has an experienced team delivering technical outcomes for their clients – from strategy to execution. This partnership will help the technology become more robust and ready for large-scale adoption.” 

Daniel Weatherhead
Daniel Weatherhead
A communications, marketing and brand manager with a focus on emerging digital inbound strategies to improve business functions and delight clients. Experience working across educational and business markets in Australia and Asia - Pacific.

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