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A new Leonardo for 2019

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A new Leonardo for 2019

The beginnings of Leonardo Consulting started humbly. Our first office was located in the stuffy front room of a small weatherboard house located in the southern suburbs of Brisbane that I rented in September of 1999.

Leonardo Consulting was named after the technologist and innovator Leonardo Da Vinci - and was founded to help enterprises implement a little-known BPM tool called ARIS - made by German software developer IDS Scheer.

Fast forward to 2014 - we decided to create a technology arm of the business that would help execute on the great architectural work that our consulting team delivered. That small group now has grown tenfold and has developed our business into new clients, new services and new partnerships - both in Australia and worldwide.

Together, the skills and capabilities of our current team allows Leonardo to truly delivery end-to-end process improvement - from strategy to execution.

lcstacksimple-700pxToday Leonardo Consulting is more than just a consulting company. We are a 70+ diverse team of developers, consultants, trusted-advisors, technologists, project managers, scrum-masters, coaches, architects, agile delivery-leads, knowledge managers, trainers, analysts, pre-sales, channel marketers, business administrators and team-leaders.

Just as people and businesses evolve, so do brands. I am excited to announce we marking a new chapter of our company - we’re evolving our business to simply ‘Leonardo’.

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We feel that this better represents our business to you- and opens up possibilities as we keep evolving to meet market changes.

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Thanks to the Leonardo community for your continued support in 2018 – and for the previous 20 years.

From the team at Leonardo, we would like to wish you and your families a happy festive season and extend to you our best wishes for a prosperous New Year. 

cnChris Nagel 
Founder & Managing Director 

Chris Nagel
Chris Nagel
Chris Nagel is the Founder and Managing Director of Leonardo.

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The Ultimate Guide to Process Modelling

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Moving From Continuous Improvement to Continuous Process Management

  Continuous process improvement is a common organizational aspiration, and it is one of the most difficult things an organization can attempt. The continuous aspect is quite a challenge, as is realizing business performance improvements—especially once the easy and obvious changes have been made. Organizations need an ‘internal improvement engine’ that replaces insistence with evidence.

Process Architecture vs the Organisation Chart

  In my working life I spend a lot of time working with client organizations to discover and capture useful models of their process architecture. In every country, industry sector, organization type and size, there is a common problem that bedevils every project. We all, and I include myself here, can too easily slip into the habit of the last 100 years (or you might argue 1,000 years) of visualizing the organization as its organization chart. Comments such as “What about the work they do in department X?” might just be a useful test for a developing process architecture, or they might indicate a lack of understanding of what the architecture represents.