<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1907245749562386&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
Event_bg

The Leonardo Blog

All Posts

The importance of a process measurement friendly culture

15_Blog_aUGUST-4

One of the most significant roadblocks to robust process performance governance—and subsequent process improvement and management—is the absence of a measurement-friendly organizational culture. In an organization where process measurement is a precursor to the allocation of blame, the instinct is to measure as little as possible and to conceal the measures that are unavoidable. Where performance process measures are collected to facilitate disparagement, enthusiasm for testing and reporting performance cannot be expected.

Measurement phobia...is the enemy of process improvement. 

During a process-improvement project, a strange conversation happened with a senior manager. The project team was investigating a process with a customer satisfaction problem, and had developed three change ideas that would significantly increase customer satisfaction at quite low cost. Quite rightly, the team was pleased with its work. However, the senior manager pushed back and found reasons why the changes should not be made. This went on for several days, with the team dispatching each new objection as it came up. Finally, the manager took the project leader aside and explained that his real concern was that if customer satisfaction increased from 83% to 95%, he would get sacked. He was prepared to accept a new target of 85% and that, over time (a year or two), it might be “safe” to achieve the 95% mark. He was serious. This was a culture of continuous dissembling, not continuous improvement.

Most people will readily agree that continuous improvement is a noble aspiration and a practical objective. The other side of that same coin, however, is to be continuously finding aspects of the organization that are not performing as well as they might. This ‘negative’ perspective is not always as welcome. Explaining to a manager that there are ways to cost-effectively achieve significant improvement in the performance of one of her processes may not be received as the good news it was thought to be. The manager, and the organization, might see that as a past failure rather than an ongoing success.

To some extent, this happens in all organizations. When was the last time that finding a new performance problem triggered a celebration in any organization?

Measurement phobia, caused by an organization’s predisposition to use performance data to censure rather than improve, is the enemy of process improvement and management. The personal, team, and organizational culture must be such that all stakeholders are always looking for, and openly finding, things that need to be improved.

A process measurement-friendly culture is a prerequisite for the success of process-based management. Such cultural change needs to be actively nurtured in parallel with the process performance measures discovery ideas outlined in the paper below.

Process Measurement BPM

Roger Tregear
Roger Tregear
Roger is a Consulting Director with Leonardo. He delivers consulting and education assignments around the world. This work has involved many industry sectors, diverse cultures, and organization types. Roger briefs executives, coach managers, and support project teams to develop process-based management. Several thousand people have attended Roger's training courses and seminars in many countries - and Roger frequently presents at international business conferences. Roger has been writing a column on BPTrends called Practical Process for over 10 years. This led to the 2013 book of the same name. In 2011, he co-authored Establishing the Office of Business Process Management. He contributed a chapter in The International Handbook on Business Process Management (2010, 2015). With Paul Harmon in 2016, Roger co-edited Questioning BPM?, a book discussing key BPM questions. Roger's own book, Reimagining Management, was published in 2016.

Related Posts

Are We Too Good at Fixing Process Problems?

Arriving at your destination airport to discover that your checked-in bags are somewhere else is a sufficiently common occurrence to have travelers staring anxiously at the stationary carousel, then fixedly watching the point where bags are first seen, and then breathing a sigh of relief on seeing their bags finally appear. SITA reports1 that 4 billion passengers checked in 4.5 billion bags last year. While only about six bags per thousand passengers get lost, lost bags (more gently termed by the airline industry ‘mishandled baggage’) is a significant problem for airlines, airport owners and managers, and their customers. SITA further reports2 that in 2016 alone, baggage mishandling cost the industry US$2.1 billion, and in the period 2007-2016, the industry cost was a staggering US$27 Billion. The problem is easing3 with the use of new technology, but millions of pieces of luggage are still being ‘lost’ each year, costing the airlines significant amounts, and causing considerable aggravation for travelers.4

A new Leonardo for 2019

The beginnings of Leonardo Consulting started humbly. Our first office was located in the stuffy front room of a small weatherboard house located in the southern suburbs of Brisbane that I rented in September of 1999. Leonardo Consulting was named after the technologist and innovator Leonardo Da Vinci - and was founded to help enterprises implement a little-known BPM tool called ARIS - made by German software developer IDS Scheer. Fast forward to 2014 - we decided to create a technology arm of the business that would help execute on the great architectural work that our consulting team delivered. That small group now has grown tenfold and has developed our business into new clients, new services and new partnerships - both in Australia and worldwide. Together, the skills and capabilities of our current team allows Leonardo to truly delivery end-to-end process improvement - from strategy to execution. Today Leonardo Consulting is more than just a consulting company. We are a 70+ diverse team of developers, consultants, trusted-advisors, technologists, project managers, scrum-masters, coaches, architects, agile delivery-leads, knowledge managers, trainers, analysts, pre-sales, channel marketers, business administrators and team-leaders. Just as people and businesses evolve, so do brands. I am excited to announce we marking a new chapter of our company - we’re evolving our business to simply ‘Leonardo’.

Leonardo at the Red Hat Forum in Sydney

Leonardo will be exhibiting and presenting at the Red Hat Forum in Sydney at the Hyatt Regency.  Our presentation topic will be 'Using Processes-as-Microservices to Drive Better Customer Experiences' which presents an approach that combines digitised processes, business rules, and microservices that collectively deliver improved customer experiences through event-driven digital “micro-moments” – those brief interactions with your customers that can sometime be neglected.