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Marco Fargnoli

CONSULTING PRINCIPAL / TEAM LEADER Marco’s 25 years’ experience in small to large business operations from the ‘shop floor’ as an Avionics Technician to the ‘Executive boardroom’ as the Global Business Process Manager for GE Aviation Systems has provided in depth business knowledge and an excellent practical foundation to his academic qualification, Master in Business Process Management. Marco is passionate about helping people in all areas of life and infects others with his enthusiasm.

Recent Posts

Process Support - The Process Session #8

Marco Fargnoli Marco Fargnoli on November 3, 2015

 

The Process Session is a weekly video series posted on The Leonardo Blog that discusses all things BPM and Enterprise Architecture.

Today, Marco talks about Process Support.

Please let us know if you have any ideas for future topics for The Process Session. 

Watch Process Measurement, Governance and Change video seminar

Video Transcription - Process Support

Thanks for joining me again for The Process Session. Today, we’re talking about the last enabler of the 7 Enablers of Business Process Management – Process Support.

Over the past few weeks we’ve discussed process architecture – the key artefact that stores our business process which delivers value to our clients. We want to put in place some key measures – the second enabler – to ensure we are achieving what we have set out to achieve for that process. We also put some governance in place – we have a process owner who sets these measurement targets, responds to them accordingly and continues that loop on a daily, weekly or monthly basis. When there is a change, they put that into a process improvement cycle where the process is then improved. When that takes place, we have a lot of change in the organization - both to systems and people.  So we need to understand how to manage that within the process improvement cycle. In order to do that, we need to make sure the mindset and culture of the organisation is receptive and ready for change.  We then build from there build the capability within our people and our systems to be able to achieve the remainder of the seven enablers.

So today we’re going to talk about Process Support. The support of all of the above is extremely important. You will often need a central office (Office of BPM), group or team that orchestrates and coordinates this information.

Manage BPM Strategy

The way we’ve pictured this is that we have to have our own strategy in place. We need to eat our own food and products as it were; we need to have our own architecture in place to do the process of process improvement or process management. So we set a strategy to align with the organizations strategy and deliver on this.

We do so by ensuring we have proper methods and systems in place.  We have to have our management processes in place to help support this team/office and support the organization.  We need to be able to deliver the process improvement methodologies.  We also need to support this office. It doesn’t have to be big! I can be done with a small number of people and in some organizations it can be achieved with part of a role. As your organization grows, so too must this grow either using a centralized or decentralized model.

Support Process Management

We come with the organization strategy front of mind and we need to filer all of the strategic demands and operational demands and shift them into a project portfolio. The project needs to determine which projects (with our limited resources) we can address first. That then funnels into process improvement projects that we deliver upon.

Supporting Process Improvement

We need to understand what process improvement methodologies we want to use. We want to be sure that if we use 6 sigma, we’re ready and enabled to deliver this through the organization. The management office shouldn’t be the place where everything gets done – it is the place that orchestrates the everything being done within the business.  To what extent we have trained people in and outside the office depends on the culture of the organisation, what is trying to be achieved and which projects we’re trying to deliver on. In this space we’re wanting continuous improvement, to move from a ‘as-is’ to a better ‘as-is’ – a business better than usual situation. We do this using various techniques of lean, six-sigma or any other methods to get there.

Support of the Office of BPM

In the final part of this process office is the support, where the tools and methodologies that enable this effectively and efficiently come from. We need to understand:

  • how big this is going to be so we can manage the roles and responsibilities .
  • the budget required; how to we make money and save money within a function of this. We have services that need to managed in an efficient and effective way.

That is effectively the support enabler that ensures all the other process enablers (architecture, measurement, governance, mindset, change, capability) ties together to deliver process improvement.

So what if don’t have any of these seven enablers? What are the end results if we don’t have any one of the seven enablers operating properly.

7 Enablers of BPM Journey to BPM Maturity

  • If we don’t have a process architecture – then we’re looking towards disharmony because we don’t understand how our business processes really link together
  • If we don’t have measurement in place and a measurement method that is properly implemented – then it is guesswork we’re doing in our business
  • If we don’t have a governance structure in place – then we’re looking towards anarchy
  • If we don’t have change put in place at the beginning – then it is futility
  • If we don’t have the right mindset – then we’re looking at disunity within the people, within the organization
  • If we don’t have the right capability enabled – then we will end up with frustration

However when you have all seven operating together, harmoniously, orchestrated very well by a central office (OBPM) then and only then will you have true transformation.

 

Process-Session-Process-Support

 

Topics: BPM - Business Process Management, The Process Session

Process Capability - The Process Session #7

Marco Fargnoli Marco Fargnoli on October 26, 2015

 

The Process Session is a weekly video series posted on The Leonardo Blog that discusses all things BPM and Enterprise Architecture.

Today, Marco talks about Process Capability.

Please let us know if you have any ideas for future topics for The Process Session. 

Watch Process Measurement, Governance and Change video seminar

Video Transcription - Process Capability

Thank you joining me today in The Process Session.  We’ve been discussing the 7 Enablers of Business Process Management over the last few weeks. Today we're discussing Process Capability.

7 Enablers of BPM Overview

What they are made up of is:

Process Capability

What are the capabilities we are looking at to drive successful process improvement? Today we’re looking at the business process capability within an organisation to allow them to get successful change, successful improvement and process management. 

These are the key capabilities you will required in your business to achieve this in your organisation:

  1. Everyone in your organisation needs to understand the basics of business process management. We want 5000 process analysts not 5. You don’t only 5 people doing this is our business, you want everyone contributing to this change. That is very possible – just to varying levels and degrees. Everyone should understand the value that BPM provides
  2. What are the process improvement and management methods do you use? Do you use Lean or Six Sigma? What are the methodologies that you don’t use within your organisation ? How do you select the right group of people to build these capabilities.
  3. You want idea generation. “Innovate – now!” – That doesn’t just happen. You need to understand how we do that and what methods do we use.
  4. Process Change Management needs to be understood. How do you do it in your organisation?
  5. You need a methodology for performance measurement.
  6. You need to understand the process governance structure. Who does what and what is the role of the process owner?
  7. You need to understand the tools, the language and the conventions that you speak in order to model and analyse our business processes.

Tips for Implementing Process Capability

This doesn’t need to be a costly affair or intricate. Some of the ways you can do this easily and efficiently are:

  • Maximise the use of people in process improvement projects. Engage everyone you can to varying levels/degrees/commitment/time to expose them to this thinking;
  • Communicate it broadly across the organisation as to how process improvement is operating
  • Get external process thinkers that are knwon for talking process in various areas. They can speak into your organisation to teach and share.
  • Educate – go to conferences, go to webinars and there is a plethora of information online
  • Publish your process information – make sure that anything that is modelled or designed is communicated effectively and is pulled from the organization and consumed. Otherwise it is ineffective if it is sitting there not being used.
  • Visit other organisations to see how they implemented business process management

Next week we are going to talk about process support and discuss how we go about implementing all we’ve discussed in the last few months in a sustained way for your organisation.


Thanks – have a great week.

 

Process-Session-Process-Capability

 

Topics: BPM - Business Process Management, The Process Session

Process Mindset - The Process Session #6

Marco Fargnoli Marco Fargnoli on October 20, 2015

The Process Session is a weekly video series posted on The Leonardo Blog that discusses all things BPM and Enterprise Architecture.

Today, Marco talks about Process Mindset.

Please let us know if you have any ideas for future topics for The Process Session. 

Watch Process Measurement, Governance and Change video seminar

Video Transcription - Process Mindset

Thank you again for joining me in The Process Session.

 We’re talking about the 7Enablers of Business Process Management (BPM).  We’ve spoken about:

  • Process Architecture – where do the processes live?
  • Process Measurement – what are the critical few process we want to measure and what are the correct measures for them?
  • Process Governance – what is the role of the process owner? How do they set certain targets and make sure that they are measured properly and responded to correctly? How do they ensure that they remain in that loop to ensure the processes are continually aligned?
  • Process Change – what can we do when processes come out of alignment? How do we embed change (which is central to process management) into the process improvement lifecycle so that we plan to have a successful outcome to our change projects.

From there, we realise that most projects impact people. If our team has a mindset that says “I don’t want to do this. I don’t like change…” -  then we have to have mechanisms and a strategy in place to ensure that we can bring them along on the journey.

We think that 90% is mindset and 10% is toolset  when it comes to changing people’s minds. It might not be a hard fact, but it certainly isn’t the other way around.  So in order to do that, we want people who are:

  • measurement friendly,
  • community focused – not focused just on themselves,
  • quality motivated – they want to do the best they can and they want to know what they need to achieve and how they need to achieve it,
  • change welcoming – because change is constant,
  • challenge addicted
  • action oriented.

That’s the kind of attributes that we want in the 90% of the mindset change in an organization to continually change with our environment.

So what are some of the things we can put in place that will drive more of this change-positive behaviour and less of the fear-driven behaviours?

  • get together in round-tables or community groups outside of your organisation
  • get alongside of people that think in the same sorts of ways and be energized by their enthusiasm
  • create process improvement discussion groups within your own organisation – set these up on regular time (lunch breaks, afternoon coffee breaks) and raise awareness of various methods within your own organisation
  • make available libraries of documentation and repositories which include success stories that articulate how change can have a positive impact on organizations
  • create scoreboards within your organization that you can point to and look at to see how various processes are responding to the measures, and reward the teams and individuals who are involved in these processes for achieving those outcomes. We want performance measurement systems in place that can drive the correct thinking and behaviour to achieve the best outcomes out of our processes.
  • organise idea-schemes across the organization, but make sure they are focused and ones that work.

These are the key things that you can to help embed in your organisation to ensure we get the right process mindset to drive the correct process improvement.

So until next time where we discuss Process Capability you have a great week. Thank you.

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Topics: The Process Session

Selecting a Process Measurement Framework

Marco Fargnoli Marco Fargnoli on October 14, 2015

Process Measurement

While many agree on the importance of process measurement, few actually implement good, relevant metrics that allow them to analyse organisational performance and conduct business process improvement initiatives that target critical process issues and opportunities. Few organisations adopt an enterprise-wide measurement framework.

Frameworks such as APQC can also be used to compare the performance of an organisation to its competitors or other industries; but, all too often, organisations use the APQC classification framework as their process architecture.

Frameworks can provide information about the average performance of organisations in the same industry and other industries and, therefore, provide a benchmark—but it is debatable how valuable this is, because not all processes are identical.

End-to-end, cross-functional processes are rarely taken into consideration in these frameworks. If they are, the metrics designed around processes are very narrow—for example, process cycle time or process costs—and do not consider the end outcome of the process. Additionally, the challenge for organisations is to select the right measures.

Organisations do not need a hundred different measures—but they need the five measures that actually matter to them in their specific situations. Using a generic measure out of its framework also involves the risk that dependencies between measures are not identified.

For example, a sales person is measured for how many sales orders he can bring in during a given sales cycle (time period). If the quality measure is too lax, we will find waste through rework in the downstream processes, which cannot be completed without all the correct and required information that should have been captured by the upstream ‘capture sales order’ process. This is called a ‘perverse incentive’, as it incentivises the sales person to produce poor quality orders and in large volumes. It also poorly reflects on the downstream process, usually performed by another organisational unit.

If we agree that every organisation delivers value to their customers through their business processes, the performance of these business processes has to be measured to assess whether organisations have achieved their goals or not. Only process-centric measurement frameworks can gather data about cross-functional performance and value delivery to the organisation’s customers.

Thanks to Philipp Joebges for his contribution to this topic.

Download 'The Measurement Wasteland' Paper

 

Topics: BPM/EA Technology

Process Change - The Process Session #5

Marco Fargnoli Marco Fargnoli on October 12, 2015

The Process Session is a weekly video series posted on The Leonardo Blog that discusses all things BPM and Enterprise Architecture.

Today, Marco talks about Process Change. 

Please let us know if you have any ideas for future topics for The Process Session. 

Watch Process Measurement, Governance and Change video seminar

Video Transcription - Process Change

Thanks for joining me today in the Process Session for the 7 Enablers of BPM.

So we’ve spoken about Process Architecture – where do you processes live? We’ve talked about how we select the critical few processes and put some measures against them so that we know how they are performing. We’ve talked about Process Governance – what is the role of the process owner and how does that impact on what we do in the process improvement cycle?

Today we are talking about Process Change

Process Change

So Process Change is central to the 7Enablers of BPM. It is key that we understand this, and we embed it. We purposefully embed change into the continuous improvement lifecycle so that we have maximise the benefit through process change management. If we don’t do that, we fail to deliver what we intended.

So the Process Owners have their Process Architecture, they define some key measures, and out of that (depending on the circumstances – external or internal to the organisation) they drive change for business improvement. We kick off the process improvement lifecycle looking at the AS IS (may or may not), we define a TO BE (nearly always), and then come up with a list of this TO DO to make that change successful. Often we forget to embed change management into this process. We then have a high risk of failure and not succeeding of the goals we set out with. 

We always want to go a ‘BBTU – Business Better than Usual’. Sometimes we fail, sometimes we succeed.  In order to maximise successes, we ensure that we plan for change and embed a change model into the continual improvement cycle (Kotter’s 8 Steps). We avoid this ‘Implementation Chasm’ by doing so. Kotter’s 8 Step program is really broken down into 3 phrases. The first phase is creating a climate for change –developing a sense of urgency and ensuring that the organisation is ready for that change you are going to implement through the processes that are going to impact on the people & systems aligned to that processes.  The second is making sure the organisation is engaged and comes along in that model. The third is embedding that process change management so we achieve the change.

Next time we talk about the process mindset – and we will want to  understand how we engage people to change their thinking, so when they come to their workplace every day, they are looking for ways to improve the process.

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Topics: The Process Session